Apple Computer Defeats Frivilous Lawsuit by Apple Records

BBC NEWS | Entertainment | Beatles lose Apple court battle: “‘I conclude that the use of the apple logo … does not suggest a relevant connection with the creative work,'”

‘I think that the use of the apple logo is a fair and reasonable use of the mark in connection with the service, which does not go further and unfairly or unreasonably suggest an additional association with the creative works themselves.'”

– Mr Justice Anthony Mann

Now somewhere in the black mountain hills of Dakota there lived a young lawyer who liked to file frivilous lawsuits against other companies for totally stupid and dense reasons… but it would appear that once again common sense prevails.

Earlier this year you may have read my rant here called Bang Bang Maxwell’s Silver iPod and the Absurdity of Licensing with regards to Apple records claim that Apple Computer was violating their creativeness by selling iTunes on the internet.

I, of course, think that iTunes are for suckers, but that is beside the point and another conversation for another day. The point is though that for companies to try and maintain such broad control over copyright is ludicrous.

This case was pretty basic and even though Apple stupidly agreed to in a settlement a number of years back to not get into the music business, this lame attempt on the part of Sir McCartney and Sir Ringo Star was nothing but a money grubbing attempt to get their piece of the honey pie on somebody else’s back.

I’m glad the courts did the right thing here and ruled in Apple’s favor. Expert, texpert choking smokers don’t you think the joker laughs at you.

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